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3. Effective Governance
3.1 Democratic Representation
3.2 Lack of Corruption
3.3 Efficient Administration
In-Country Assessment Information

3. Effective Governance

Goal – A popularly elected government free of corruption and functioning efficiently and transparently enough to guarantee economic freedom to individuals and support equitable property markets

 

 

3.1 Democratic Representation

Core Question: Does the country have free and open elections for the leadership and can citizens engage in free enterprise? Yes – Strong. Mexicans enjoy freedom of expression and association, free media, freedom from state surveillance, reasonable access to legislative information, and relatively low government intervention in the markets. The weakest area in Mexico’s democratic representation, however, was its lack of safeguards against conflicts of interest in the executive and especially the legislative branch.

 

3.1.1 Voice & Accountability

3.1.1.1 Are citizens able to elect their government and do they enjoy freedom of expression, association and a free media? Yes – Strong. Mexico’s score of 0.09 in 2012 earned it a place at the 55th percentile. Trend ↑ – this is an improvement over Mexico’s performance in 2011, which was at the 54th percentile.

Source: Governance Matters 2012, World Bank
http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.aspx#reports

3.1.1.2 Are citizens free to form political and civic organizations free of state interference and surveillance? Yes – Strong. Mexico’s EIU Civil Liberties score in 2013 was 7.35, giving Mexico a rank of 51st.

Source: The Economist Intelligence Unit Democracy Index
http://www.eiu.com/public/topical_report.aspx?campaignid=Democracy0814

 

3.1.2 Public Information

Overall Ranking – Weak; Score 68 out of 100 (2011); Trend ↓ from a score of 72 in 2009.

3.1.2.1 Are there regulations governing conflicts of interest in the executive and legislative branches of government? No – Weak – the scores for safeguards against of conflicts of interest in Mexico in 2011 were 62 (Weak) for the executive Branch, and 52 (Very Weak) for the legislative branch.

3.1.2.2 Can citizens access legislative processes and documents? Yes – Strong. The ability of Mexican citizens to access legislative information was scored at 75 in 2011.

Source: Global Integrity Website:
https://www.globalintegrity.org/global_year/2011/

 

3.1.3 Market Intervention

Overall Freedom Ranking – Strong. With a score of 66.8, Mexico ranked 55th out of 178 nations in 2014. Trend ↓ – this score is a drop from Mexico’s rank of 50 the prior year.

3.1.3.1 To what extent does the government intervene in the private sector including state owned industries? Government spending is 27% of Mexico’s GDP.

3.1.3.2 To what extent does the government control prices? Mexico received a Monetary Freedom score of 77.4 out of 100.

The Heritage Foundation points out that launching a business in Mexico takes 6 procedures and 6 days on average, but licensing takes 2+ months.

Source: Index of Economic Freedom Website
http://www.heritage.org/index/

 

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3.2 Lack of Corruption

Core Question: Is the public sector transparent and free of corruption? Strong – Mexico has had most of the NIS pillars in place for several decades, and has only a moderate level of reported extralegal payments. However, the perceived level of corruption in the broader sense is worryingly high, with Mexico ranking worse than over 100 other countries in this regard.

Transparency

3.2.1   What is the perceived level of corruption in the country? High – Weak. With a score of 34 in 2013, Mexico ranks 106th out of 177 countries on the issue of transparency and perceived levels of corruption. Trend ↓ – Mexico has dropped one place in the country rankings since 2012.

Source: Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index
http://cpi.transparency.org/cpi2013/results/

Integrity Mechanisms

3.2.2   A National Integrity System is a framework where the principle institutions that contribute to integrity, transparency and accountability in a society can address corruption in a systematic way. Does a National Integrity System exist? Yes – Strong. Most of the NIS pillars were in place in Mexico at the start of the 21st century, including: budget approval processes; judicial independence features; ombudsman; auditor general’s office; conflict of interest laws; anti-cronyism rules; and mechanisms for citizen complaints against various arms of government.

Source: National Integrity System Assessment, Transparency International
http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/nis/nis_reports_by_country

Extralegal Payments

3.2.3   How often do companies report that officials and/or companies expect additional payments to “expedite” services or gain business? Infrequently – Very Strong. Only 9.6% of survey participants reported having to make extralegal payments. This compares very favorably with the global average of 13.2%, although it is somewhat higher than the regional average for Latin America of 6.5%.

Source: Enterprise Surveys
http://www.enterprisesurveys.org

 

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3.3 Efficient Administration

Core Question: Are quality services and qualified civil servants available to the public through the efficient use of public money? Strong – With government spending at manageable proportions, and a strong overall rating for government effectiveness, Mexico’s main weakness in this arena is its somewhat weak civil service.

Size of Government

3.3.1   What is the size of government relative to GDP? Strong – Mexico’s annual government spending as a percentage of GDP is relatively low, at 27%

Source: Index of Economic Freedom Website
http://www.heritage.org/index/

Civil Service

3.3.2   What is the quality of the civil service? Weak – Mexico’s 2011 score of 61 out of 100 for the quality of its civil service was down two points from its 2009 score.

Source: Global Integrity Website:
https://www.globalintegrity.org/global_year/2011/

Government Effectiveness

3.3.3   What is the overall effectiveness of the government? Strong – Mexico received a country ranking in the 63rd percentile for its 2012 score on government effectiveness of 0.32. Trend Flat – Mexico also placed at the 63rd percentile the previous year.

Source: World Bank’s Governance Matters, World Bank
http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.aspx#reports

 

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In-Country Assessment Information